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Footnotes to Michael Kramer's "Can't Forget the Motor City"

1. See Charles Kaiser, 1968 in America: Music, Politics, Chaos, Counterculture and the Shaping of a Generation (1988; reprint, New York: Grove Press, 1997).

2. Pat Shellenbarger, "Irreverence Fuels National Music Magazine," Detroit News, January 26, 1975.

3. For the story of how Creem got its name, see Richard C. Walls, "Twenty-Five Years of Creem, Part Two," Creem, March/April 1994, 40.

4. Barry Kramer, "Creem Is," Creem 1 (March 1-14, 1969): 26.

5. Richard C. Walls, "The Creative Listener," Creem 1 (March 1-14, 1969): 6

6. R. Crumb, "Mr. Dream Whip," Creem 1 (March 15-31, 1969): cover. Crumb had been visiting Detroit in March of 1969.

7. Dave Marsh, "MC5 Back on Shakin' Street," Creem 3 (October 1971): 37.

8. Dave Marsh, Fortunate Son: Criticism and Journalism by America's Best-Known Rock Writer (New York: Random House, 1985), 204-5.

9. David Felton, Mindfuckers: A Source Book on the Rise of Acid Fascism in America (San Francisco: Straight Arrow Books, 1972), 9-11.

10. Dave Marsh, "Looney Toons: Every Picture Tells a Story...Don't It," Creem 3 (March 1972): 26.

11. Dave Marsh, "Will Success Spoil the Frut?" 32.

12. Dave Marsh, "Looney Toons," Creem 2 (December 1970): 22.

13. Marsh, "Will Success Spoil the Frut?" 31, 33.

14. Ibid., 31-32.

15. The first glossy magazine version was Creem 3 (March 1971).

16. Kramer, "Creem Is," 26; "Michigan's Music Paper," Creem 2 (September/October 1969): 26; "The Midwest's Music Magazine," Creem 2 (March 1970): 19; "America's Only Rock and Roll Magazine," Creem 4 (August 1972). A number of 1971 covers featured the slogan, "A Magazine of News Fiction Poetry Film Books TV Records."

17. Bangs, "James Taylor Marked for Death," 69. For the details of Bangs's move, see DeRogatis, Let It Blurt, 66-70.

18. Bangs, "James Taylor Marked for Death," 69.

19. Ibid., 64-65.

20. Ibid., 65.

21. Ibid.

22. Lester Bangs, review, The Rowan Brothers, Creem 4 (January 1973): 74-75.

23. Ibid.

24. Lester Bangs, "Of Pop and Pies and Fun, a Program for Mass Liberation in the Form of a Stooges Review, or, Who's the Fool?" part one, Creem 2 (November 1970); ibid., part two, Creem 2 (December 1970); republished in Bangs, Psychotic Reactions, 31-52. Quotation in Psychotic Reactions, 33.

25. Bangs, Psychotic Reactions, 32.

26. Lester Bangs, review, REO Speedwagon and Bullangus, Creem 3 (May 1972): 68.

27. Bangs, Psychotic Reactions, 34.

28. Bangs, "James Taylor Marked for Death," 74.

29. Ibid., 75.

30. The idea of the "public sphere" is taken from Jürgen Habermas, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere: An Inquiry into a Category of Bourgeois Society (Cambridge: MIT Press, 1989), although he would probably disagree with placing the concept in a mass-consumer context. For an introduction to the debate about Habermas's notion of the "public sphere," see Craig J. Calhoun, ed., Habermas and the Public Sphere (Cambridge: MIT Press, 1992).

31. William Bridges, "Found Art," letter, Creem 5 (November 1973): 8.

32. Mike Corbett, letter, Creem 5 (September 1973): 10.

33. Battiste Everett-Wells, letter, Creem 4 (February 1973): 8.

34. Laura Liben, letter, Creem 3 (May 1971): 4.

35. In terms of gender, Creem could be as intimidating and sexist an organization as any in the rock world, but it did offer opportunities to a number of female writers and editors- Pam Brent, Debbie Burr, Roberta Cruger, and Jaan Uhelszki among them. As with race, issues of gender at Creem warrant more analysis than the length of this article will allow.

36. Len Bailes, letter, Creem 3 (May 1971): 2, 6.

37. David M. Lewark, letter, Creem 3 (May 1972): 82.


Michael J. Kramer is a doctoral student in history at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.